Brett Ratner Desires to Make Sequel to Roman Polanski Documentary

roman-polanski“Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired” is a film that methodically documents the director’s famous trial nearly thirty years later and the way in which it transformed into a scene out of one of his movies: the judge directing his own self-made script, the principle players standing in as the actors, the press attempting to cultivate the most prurient storyline, and the theme of an out of control trial corrupting all those involved. Just by virtue of its nature, the documentary involuntarily casts Polanski in a sympathetic light,  revealing the divide between the distance and intimacy with which the Americans and Europeans respectively viewed him, but there is even more sympathy for justice, which had been trumped by the judge’s own personal pride, and the victim, who had to endure a trial she didn’t deserve.

In a recent interview for a Movie Geeks United podcast, which was taped hours before Polanski’s arrest in Zurich and will be available for download on October 4th, Brett Ratner explains that he plans to produce a sequel to the Marina Zenovich documentary. The New York Post quotes Ratner:

“The family has forgiven [Polanski]. The victim has forgiven him. The rest of the world has forgiven him,” said Ratner, who cast Polanski as a French detective in his movie “Rush Hour 3.” “The LA judicial system is corrupt. It’s horrible.”

The two filmmakers have developed an interesting bond. Just last year Polanski invited Ratner on a road trip through Poland (pictures at Heeb Magazine, via Cinematical) but did not tell him in advance that they were planning to visit Auschwitz in order to walk through the painful corridors of Jewish history. The trip was personal for Polanski, whose mother died in Auschwitz when he was young.

Polanski was finally arrested in Zurick last Saturday during the Zurich Film Festival after 31 years of exile. His latest film, “The Ghost”, which stars Pierce Brosnan and Ewan McGregor, was in the midst of post-production but is now imperiled.

Variety quotes several foreign officials, and regardless of any opinion that one might have of Polanski’s arrest, I think that most people can agree with Zurich festival jury president Debra Winger, who said, after the event had been used to stage the arrest, “The whole art world suffers.”

Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired

Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired



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Jacob is shy. That's why he hasn't filled out his profile page yet. Hopefully he'll read this and decide to replace it with something else. If not, he'll never know I'm making fun of him in his profile. Heh heh. - Nix

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  • julie

    “The family has forgiven [Polanski]. The victim has forgiven him. The rest of the world has forgiven him,” said Ratner, who cast Polanski as a French detective in his movie “Rush Hour 3.” “The LA judicial system is corrupt. It’s horrible.”

    mhm. Translation: “I really don’t know squat about the legal aspects of this case. So I’m just gonna talk out of my @$$ and speak for THE WHOLE WORLD and say that THE WHOLE WORLD forgives him. Because the victim forgave him!” Even though, you know, that’s b.s. (Refer to the ever growing list of people–celebs included–who disdain him.) And please stop spouting the same tired stupid argument. You don’t have a leg to stand on with this “the victim forgives him” thing. Lots of victims forgive so they can get on with their lives. But you’ll notice there’s no “victim forgives, case dismissed” verdict in ANY legal case in the US. Is that what you mean by it being “corrupt?”
    Winger, who said, after the event had been used to stage the arrest, “The whole art world suffers.”
    Really, not so much. Maybe to your little circle of pretentious folks. But the rest of us, well…. we have plenty of non-rapist directors to choose from.

  • julie

    “The family has forgiven [Polanski]. The victim has forgiven him. The rest of the world has forgiven him,” said Ratner, who cast Polanski as a French detective in his movie “Rush Hour 3.” “The LA judicial system is corrupt. It’s horrible.”

    mhm. Translation: “I really don’t know squat about the legal aspects of this case. So I’m just gonna talk out of my @$$ and speak for THE WHOLE WORLD and say that THE WHOLE WORLD forgives him. Because the victim forgave him!” Even though, you know, that’s b.s. (Refer to the ever growing list of people–celebs included–who disdain him.) And please stop spouting the same tired stupid argument. You don’t have a leg to stand on with this “the victim forgives him” thing. Lots of victims forgive so they can get on with their lives. But you’ll notice there’s no “victim forgives, case dismissed” verdict in ANY legal case in the US. Is that what you mean by it being “corrupt?”
    Winger, who said, after the event had been used to stage the arrest, “The whole art world suffers.”
    Really, not so much. Maybe to your little circle of pretentious folks. But the rest of us, well…. we have plenty of non-rapist directors to choose from.

  • Jacob

    This is a movie blog, and so I generally try to keep my opinions on real world matters as ascetic as possible (I assume you’re just referring to the quotes I posted), but just for clarification, I found his act reprehensible – one of the worst things a human being could actually do. The only reason I talked about the trial is because the trial happened to be the subject of the documentary, not the act itself, though apparently the trial was also a mess. Legal matters should be served as dispassionately as possible, no matter the crime, which I don’t think happened in this case. I don’t have any sympathy for Polanski, but I don’t know the proper legal proceedings in the case of his arrest, and so I’ll demure on a firm opinion there. But Ratner isn’t exactly dispassionate either, and so I wonder if a follow-up documentary would be tainted by that.

  • Jacob

    This is a movie blog, and so I generally try to keep my opinions on real world matters as ascetic as possible (I assume you’re just referring to the quotes I posted), but just for clarification, I found his act reprehensible – one of the worst things a human being could actually do. The only reason I talked about the trial is because the trial happened to be the subject of the documentary, not the act itself, though apparently the trial was also a mess. Legal matters should be served as dispassionately as possible, no matter the crime, which I don’t think happened in this case. I don’t have any sympathy for Polanski, but I don’t know the proper legal proceedings in the case of his arrest, and so I’ll demure on a firm opinion there. But Ratner isn’t exactly dispassionate either, and so I wonder if a follow-up documentary would be tainted by that.