Gareth Edwards is Striving for a Grounded, Realistic Godzilla Movie. Say What Now?

10 Comments

Godzilla (2014) Movie PosterLet me remind you that Godzilla was created by an atomic explosion, and mutated into a giant lizard that breathes atomic fire when he gets really pissed off, and shows up to fight other giant monsters from outer space and various city-smashing monstrosities. Good luck there, Gareth!

But maybe I’m reading him wrong. Here’s what he really said to Total Film Magazine (via Coventry Telegraph) regarding his approach to the one of the original monster bad boys:

I’ve always been interested in Godzilla and the ideas around him. I really wanted to see another Godzilla film and jumped at the opportunity. My main idea was to imagine ‘If this really happened, what would it be like?’ I want to take a grounded, realistic approach to a Godzilla film.

So no, I didn’t read him wrong after all. He also goes on to compare working on the film’s special effects shots to losing his virginity. I guess, er, that’s one way to go about it.

I imagine most people reading about how a director wanting to make a monster movie more “grounded and realistic” will be snickering at the idea. The thing is, Edwards could make it work. A “Godzilla” film could still be fantastical and at the same time realistic. Sort of. Edwards already did it with “Monster”, his indie film that got him the “Godzilla” gig in the first place, so there’s precedence.

Of course, it would be nice if “Godzilla” wasn’t the snorefest that the highly overrated “Monsters” turn out to be, but maybe that’s just me.

Author: Nix

Editor/Writer at BeyondHollywood.com. Likes: long walks on the beach and Kevin Costner post-apocalyptic movies. Dislikes: 3D, shaky cam, and shaky cam in 3D. Got a site issue? Wanna submit Movie/TV news? Or to email me in regards to anything on the site, you can do so at nix (at) beyondhollywood.com.
  • DDbeauty

    the first US godzilla movie was already more “realistic” than its japanese counterpart..and it sucked. make it any more true to life, and it will just be a regular monster movie like Jaws or Alligator

    • http://www.grifiti.com Tin Hoang

      Exactly. Why even call it Godzilla. You’re defeating the purpose of making a Godzilla movie if the creature doesnt have that high pitch roar.

      I think they already did a more realistic Godzilla. One of the Jurassic parks had a t-rex loose in the city.

  • Arthur

    The original “Gojira” (1954) was a serious and grounded film and it is a masterpiece. “The Return of Godzilla” (1984) was on the same order as was “Rodan”, “Gamera: The Brave”, Shusuke Kaneko’s “Godzilla, Mothra, King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack” (2001). I think Gareth Williams is going in the right direction. How can anyone say that Emmerich’s “Godzilla” (1998) film was serious, realistic or grounded? Monster films as of late have been some serious, more realistic and grounded films like: “Cloverfield”, “Super 8″, “The Host”, “Sector 7″, “The Mist”, “Troll Hunter” and Gareth’s own “Monsters”. With some light exceptions like “Attack The Block”, “Big Man Japan”, “Negadon: Monster From Mars”, “Long and Dark-Haired Monster Geharha” and “Death Kappa”.

    • Arthur

      OOPS! I mean Gareth Edwards!!! Jeez!!!

      • http://www.grifiti.com Tin Hoang

        I think the 1998’s Godzilla tried to be “realistic” with the creature design while still trying to keep some of the aesthetics of the original. Wasn’t it angry because it was looking for its egg or something?

        But I don’t think you can compare Emmerich’s movie to any of the originals that you mentioned other than Godzilla (in name only) is in them.

        The Japanese ones was an entire world. Monster Island had a whole slew of “monsters” living in semi peace. As you can see, they only real things in them are that there are people. Don’t get me wrong, I loved these movies. I grew up watching them every weekend on the Family Film Festival with that dude that drew Popeye.

        The music score for Gamera coming to the rescue was awesome.

        On another side note, they should remake “Giant Robot.”

  • RODNEY

    TRI STAR’S GODZILLA sucked and he ain’t no GOJIRA, either!

  • Budgiecat

    I’m curious to know why Toho even gave Hollywood a second chance. They don’t even acknowledge 1998 Godzilla as “Godzilla”; that’s how ashamed they are of it (they just call it “Zilla”) and had the real Godzilla destroy it in mere seconds in the last Godzilla movie….

    I guess Toho is that hard up for cash these days…

    • johnny

      Why wouldn’t they?

      Tri-Star/Sony did the 1998 version, this is Legendary Pictures/Warner Bro’s so none of the same people or company’s are involved this time around.
      Toho has also made there share of bad Godzilla films, Yes the 98 film was a disgrace but that doesn’t mean this will be.

      Should be a little more optimistic until trailers start arriving an we actually SEE the direction there going an the design of Godzilla an the other monsters on film.

  • tenup

    Can’t wait for the trailers to start rolling in. The wait for this movie has been a little too extensive.

  • Darrien

    My worry is they make Godzilla tiny … Smaller than the American 1998 lizard. That would be terrible, and these people better not miss the point – 1. Godzilla is HUGE … 334 feet tall, in Godzilla v Mecha-King Ghidorah, and Godzilla v Mothra v Battra. .. The Heisei era Godzilla was the quintessential Godzilla monster. 2. He’s a nuclear monster. … They better have him use his fire-breath and have it be powerful. 3. He’s indestructible. Man-made weapons are generally ineffective against him. {The 1998 movie REALLY blew it, there}.

    The producers stick to that, and if the opponent monster is kool, tough and not lame – –
    they can’t screw this up.