James Mudge at the 10th China Independent Film Festival

No Comments
Prev2 of 10Next

Features
长片

Timothy Weinert and Celina Jade in Tomorrow Comes Today (2013) Movie Image

Tomorrow Comes Today

Taiwanese writer director Ming Lang Chen’s “Tomorrow Comes Today” is a cross cultural affair, following a young guy called Dah-Yi from Taiwan, working as a Chinese food delivery man in New York while searching for his mother, brandishing a picture of Marlene Dietrich at everyone he meets. Meanwhile, the film also follows his neighbour Wayne, recently dumped by his girlfriend and trying to forget her by listening to tapes on how to erase memories during his nightly work cleaning phone booths. It’s very much in line with what many would expect from an indie film in the western or US sense, with a meandering plot, lots of symbolism – some clever, some clumsy – and plenty of whimsical touches as its two narrative strands crisscross.

Though it doesn’t always work, in general the film is quite charming, and Ming Lang Chen does manage to effectively make some interesting observations on the ways in which the east and west meet, diverge and balance. Through anecdotal details the film depicts connections and near-misses between strangers, their lives often mirroring each other while often remaining out of reach, and this similarly works well as a gentle cultural commentary that doesn’t come packaged with easy answers. Some gorgeous cinematography also helps make the film very watchable, capturing the look and feel of New York through some atmospheric and grounded camera work.

《你的今天和我的明天》

台湾导演陈敏郎的《你的今天和我的明天》是一部跨文化题材的作品。影片跟随了一个来自台湾名叫达一的年轻人。他一边在纽约的中餐馆送外卖,一边寻找母亲,见人就掏出一张三十年代好莱坞著名德国明星玛琳∙黛德丽的照片。影片的另一个主人公是达一的邻居,怀恩。怀恩刚和女朋友分手,在每晚清洗公共电话的工作中听着关于如何抹去记忆的磁带,企图忘记前女友。影片是大多西方或美国审美中所熟悉的独立影片风格,迂回的情节,大量的象征 — 有些很显心思,有些则有点笨拙–,以及两条叙事线各种天马行空的交错。虽然有时影片不够精彩,总体来说还是一部不错的作品。陈敏郎对东西方文化的相遇、差异和平衡作出了一些有意思的观察。通过各种逸事的细节,影片表现了陌生人之间的连接与错失。他们的人生互为镜像,又彼此隔离,这种诠释更多是一种温柔的文化解读,而不给出明确的答案。影片的镜头非常漂亮,以很有氛围感和扎实的摄影抓住了纽约的形与神,因此也令影片的可看度增加。

Prev2 of 10Next

Author: James Mudge

James is a Scottish writer based in London. He is one of BeyondHollywood.com’s oldest tenured movie reviewer, specializing in all forms of cinema from the Asian continent, as well as the angst-strewn world of independent cinema and the plasma-filled caverns of the horror genre. James can be reached at jamesmudge (at) btinternet.com, preferably with offers of free drinks.