Kevin MacDonald Admits Eagle of the Ninth is a Hit Piece on America

If you were one of those people wondering what in God’s name Kevin MacDonald (left) was doing hiring Channing Friggin Tatum to play a Roman legionnaire in his new movie “The Eagle of the Ninth”, the Scottish director has an explanation: he did it on purpose. According to MacDonald (via an interview with the UK’s TimesOnline) he purposefully cast the all-American Tatum in order to sledgehammer home his disdain for “American cultural imperialism”. To this end, he’s cast two well-known Americans, Tatum and Donald Sutherland as the leaders of an occupying Roman force that encounters Scotland’s Seal People.

“It was always my concept for this film that the Romans would be Americans…

It’s a film is about a guy who believes wholeheartedly in the values of Rome, and believes everyone else must want to become a part of the great family of Rome. Marcus thinks, ‘It would benefit them so much — can’t they see it is the only way to live their lives?’ He comes to realise there are other value systems, other people have a claim to honour in the same way that he as an American — or a Roman — can claim honour. This is a film which is some way reflects the some of current anxieties and the political questions that we all have…

That’s what we are doing — not simply reflecting on the Afghanistan or Iraq wars, but a sense of cultural imperialism. Those films dealt with torture and maltreatment of prisoners, but in the context of Indians. The parallel is definitely there, and it is part of what you would want the audience to take away from the film. But it is not necessarily literal. Literalism is very often the death of films.”

But wait, Kevin, the big bad Americans have only been doing their “Imperialism” thing for less than 100 years, while your beloved UK did it for a good 400 years, and they were infinitely harsher about “teaching” the ways of the Empire. As a Scotsman, surely you’re harboring some ill will for past deeds aka what I learned from “Braveheart”?

“Britain isn’t a force any more, we aren’t cultural imperialists. That just didn’t seem the right way to go.”

Oh, that explains it, then.

Kevn MacDonald’s “Eagle of the Ninth” arrives to explain to you the evils of America in September 24, 2010.

So wait, we're the bad guys? Aw, man, we suck.



About Nix

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Editor/Writer at BeyondHollywood.com. Likes: long walks on the beach and Kevin Costner post-apocalyptic movies. Dislikes: 3D, shaky cam, and shaky cam in 3D. Got a site issue? Wanna submit Movie/TV news? Or to email me in regards to anything on the site, you can do so at nix (at) beyondhollywood.com.

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  • tokyojesusfist

    “The parallel is definitely there, and it is part of what you would want the audience to take away from the film.”

    What I don’t understand is why liberals think they’re always being really clever and cutting edge by making movies like this. The horse has been beaten to death so badly that you need dental records to identify the remains.

  • tokyojesusfist

    “The parallel is definitely there, and it is part of what you would want the audience to take away from the film.”

    What I don’t understand is why liberals think they’re always being really clever and cutting edge by making movies like this. The horse has been beaten to death so badly that you need dental records to identify the remains.

  • erick

    “That’s what we are doing — not simply reflecting on the Afghanistan or Iraq wars, but a sense of cultural imperialism. Those films dealt with torture and maltreatment of prisoners, but in the context of Indians. The parallel is definitely there”

    TRANSLATION:
    “I hired a him-bo version of Megan Fox because he was totally hot, but now that I have to present the movie to the world, I’m covering my ass so you know why I chose the idiot who was out-acted by Marlon Wayans in a Hasbro movie.”

    Next step: when/if the movie falls on its face, blame Bush.

    You suppose these European filmmakers present their “allegorical” tales so that we forget the shenanigans their ancestors pulled in Africa, India, and China?

  • erick

    “That’s what we are doing — not simply reflecting on the Afghanistan or Iraq wars, but a sense of cultural imperialism. Those films dealt with torture and maltreatment of prisoners, but in the context of Indians. The parallel is definitely there”

    TRANSLATION:
    “I hired a him-bo version of Megan Fox because he was totally hot, but now that I have to present the movie to the world, I’m covering my ass so you know why I chose the idiot who was out-acted by Marlon Wayans in a Hasbro movie.”

    Next step: when/if the movie falls on its face, blame Bush.

    You suppose these European filmmakers present their “allegorical” tales so that we forget the shenanigans their ancestors pulled in Africa, India, and China?

  • HulkSmashNow

    When Scotland fights for its independence from Great Britain, then this guy can talk. Jerk. And he just lost ten bucks from me.

  • HulkSmashNow

    When Scotland fights for its independence from Great Britain, then this guy can talk. Jerk. And he just lost ten bucks from me.

  • Bit of history

    Just thought I'd make the point, and sorry if this seems pedantic, but Roman soldiers were Legionaries, not legionnaires – they're French.

  • Bit of history

    Just thought I'd make the point, and sorry if this seems pedantic, but Roman soldiers were Legionaries, not legionnaires – they're French.

  • Steakger97

    I’m English and I can admit yes England has done bad things, to be honest most nations have at some point in time. But to blame it on America is unfair, as i said every nation has faults and problems but to show your dislike of a nation through i film is pretty sad.