Korean Horror Flick Phone on the Remake Chopping Block

3 Comments

To be perfectly frank with you, I’m less surprised by the fact that an American production company wants to remake Ahn Byung-ki’s “Phone” as I am that it’s taken this long, with the Asian horror move remake trend seemingly on the verge of mercifully dying out. Screen Daily reports that the remake will be coming courtesy of L.A.-based Imprint Entertainment (never heard of them, though they seem to claim some sort of involvement in the “Twilight” franchise) and Korea’s Microvision, who will be shooting the film in Seoul, South Korea where it the story will be set with original director Ahn Byung-ki back behind the camera.

Here’s the plot of the original via IMDB.com:

Soon after Ji-won gets a new cell phone, her friend’s young daughter, Yeong-ju, puts it to her ear and immediately begins screaming in terror. When other strange things start happening in connection with the phone, Ji-Won does some investigating and discovers that of the people before her who had the same number, almost all of them died suddenly under unusual circumstances. As Yeong-ju’s behavior becomes increasingly alarming, Ji-won digs deeper into the circumstances surrounding the disappearance of the number’s first owner, a high school girl named Jin-hie.

As you can probably tell from the plot synopsis above, “Phone” is a pretty generic Asian horror movie about one of them fancy haunted inanimate objects, where the Final Girl must backtrack the object’s history to find the cause of all the haunting. In this case, a phone. I reviewed the film way back in 2003, and was mildly entertained, though not terribly impressed.

This is not the first Ahn Byung-ki movie to land on the remake chopping block. Previously, we had heard reports that Ahn’s “APT” was also on its way to getting an American re-dress, though nothing seems to have come from that as yet. Thankfully.

Imprint Entertainment and Microvision are looking at a Summer 2010 release date for the remake.

Below: Talk about killer roaming charges! Ahem.

Author: Nix

Editor/Writer at BeyondHollywood.com. Likes: long walks on the beach and Kevin Costner post-apocalyptic movies. Dislikes: 3D, shaky cam, and shaky cam in 3D. Got a site issue? Wanna submit Movie/TV news? Or to email me in regards to anything on the site, you can do so at nix (at) beyondhollywood.com.
  • http://www.reelloop.com/ Buckman

    All the American bastardizations of Asian horror films is mind-numbing. Copying high-quality features is one thing (“Ringu”/”The Ring”), but why take the route of making retreads based on mediocre source material? Alone, that was probably the most perplexing aspect of “The Uninvited?” Why copy a movie that was average at best? Especially when films like “Grace” are out there and fail to be picked up.

    Boo that.

  • http://www.reelloop.com/ Buckman

    All the American bastardizations of Asian horror films is mind-numbing. Copying high-quality features is one thing (“Ringu”/”The Ring”), but why take the route of making retreads based on mediocre source material? Alone, that was probably the most perplexing aspect of “The Uninvited?” Why copy a movie that was average at best? Especially when films like “Grace” are out there and fail to be picked up.

    Boo that.

  • http://www.reelloop.com Buckman

    All the American bastardizations of Asian horror films is mind-numbing. Copying high-quality features is one thing (“Ringu”/”The Ring”), but why take the route of making retreads based on mediocre source material? Alone, that was probably the most perplexing aspect of “The Uninvited?” Why copy a movie that was average at best? Especially when films like “Grace” are out there and fail to be picked up.

    Boo that.