Tom Hanks Talks The Pacific Mini-Series

34 Comments

How much am I looking forward to Tom Hanks’ return to World War II, this time in the Pacific theater, with the epic mini-series “The Pacific”? So much that I’m even contemplating signing up for HBO just so I can see the episodes as they are rolled out on their first-runs, instead of waiting for the DVD or, ahem, using other means to see them, the way I did with “Band of Brothers”. Collider recently had a chance to talk to Hanks about “The Pacific”, and here are the highlights.

Via:

Collider: I was going to ask you specifically about “The Pacific”. How is that going?

Tom Hanks: It’s half-way done. There are going to be 10 hours in there I think we just started our 5th hour down there.

Collider: And how would you compare it to “Band of Brothers”?

Tom Hanks: It has to be different because it just can’t be the same theme. It’s not as clean as “Band of Brothers”. “Band of Brothers” came from Ambrose’s book and we bought 4 or 5 books and they were like…we just happened to be able to intersect them. And we can’t just go back and re-create World War II one more time. You have to make it a much more personal saga and also the nature of warfare in the South Pacific was so different than say liberating Holland. So it’s going to be tougher. It’s going to be a hard…I mean to watch…it’s going to be a harder series.

Wow, are you kidding me? “The Pacific” is going to be “harder” than “Band of Brothers”? That’s saying a lot, because “Band of Brothers” was pretty damn brutal at certain points.

Now I’m REALLY looking forward to this…

Tom Hanks Talks The Pacific Mini-Series

Author: Nix

Editor/Writer at BeyondHollywood.com. Likes: long walks on the beach and Kevin Costner post-apocalyptic movies. Dislikes: 3D, shaky cam, and shaky cam in 3D. Got a site issue? Wanna submit Movie/TV news? Or to email me in regards to anything on the site, you can do so at nix (at) beyondhollywood.com.
  • cody mccall

    So glad the Pacific war is finally getting attention it has long deserved and it couldn’t come from two more distinguished entertainment veterans. My father took part in many ‘D-Days’ while slogging from one Pacific island to another including such tropic garden spots as New Guinea, Leyte, Mindanao, and others. He was twice wounded but it was the diseases that almost killed him. I hope this TV series at least mentions the the fact that thousands of G.I.’s fell victim to tropical diseases that were often more lethal than Japanese bullets and with effects that lasted a lifetime. I think it was three characteristics that distinguished the Pacific war from that in Europe: the vast distances, the diseases, and the kamikaze mentality of Japanese troops high on sake. My father said nothing can concentrate the mind like a screaming banzai attack in the blackness of a moonless night on a God-forsaken Pacific island ten-thousand miles from home.

  • cody mccall

    So glad the Pacific war is finally getting attention it has long deserved and it couldn’t come from two more distinguished entertainment veterans. My father took part in many ‘D-Days’ while slogging from one Pacific island to another including such tropic garden spots as New Guinea, Leyte, Mindanao, and others. He was twice wounded but it was the diseases that almost killed him. I hope this TV series at least mentions the the fact that thousands of G.I.’s fell victim to tropical diseases that were often more lethal than Japanese bullets and with effects that lasted a lifetime. I think it was three characteristics that distinguished the Pacific war from that in Europe: the vast distances, the diseases, and the kamikaze mentality of Japanese troops high on sake. My father said nothing can concentrate the mind like a screaming banzai attack in the blackness of a moonless night on a God-forsaken Pacific island ten-thousand miles from home.

  • Pat Yorgensen

    Dear Mr. Hanks,

    My father was on the Island of Peleiu and watch his platoon shot up. He was one of 7 that lived through it. His best friend died in his arms. My father never talked about it as it was too painful. He did say one time that he was suppose to get a Silver Star -but his commanding officer was killed and later when us kids got older we inquired only to find that some of the records from war where destroyed in a fire. He said that the Marine Corp didn’t want to speak about he conflict on the island. I am so glad to see that you are covering this part of the war. My dad was a hero to us kids. My dad died in 1998. Thank you again for this series. Pat Howe Yorgensen

  • Pat Yorgensen

    Dear Mr. Hanks,

    My father was on the Island of Peleiu and watch his platoon shot up. He was one of 7 that lived through it. His best friend died in his arms. My father never talked about it as it was too painful. He did say one time that he was suppose to get a Silver Star -but his commanding officer was killed and later when us kids got older we inquired only to find that some of the records from war where destroyed in a fire. He said that the Marine Corp didn’t want to speak about he conflict on the island. I am so glad to see that you are covering this part of the war. My dad was a hero to us kids. My dad died in 1998. Thank you again for this series. Pat Howe Yorgensen

  • F.N. Wright

    My father served with the 37th infantry division & saw over 300 days of combat. He fought on Guadacanal, New Georgia Island, Bouganville (the fight for hill 700) was brutal & savage) & the battle to free Luzon. At the Dampalit River he & 3 others from his company made 8 trips apiece for 2 1/2 hours under intense enemy small arms, machinr gun & mortar fire bringing back 29 dead & wounded soldiers, leaving none behind. Though recommended for the CMH the four were awarded Distinguished Service Crosses. After the freeing of Manila their company fought om two mountains east of the city. He would receive a Bronze Star for valor & a Purple heart on one of the mpountains.

  • F.N. Wright

    My father served with the 37th infantry division & saw over 300 days of combat. He fought on Guadacanal, New Georgia Island, Bouganville (the fight for hill 700) was brutal & savage) & the battle to free Luzon. At the Dampalit River he & 3 others from his company made 8 trips apiece for 2 1/2 hours under intense enemy small arms, machinr gun & mortar fire bringing back 29 dead & wounded soldiers, leaving none behind. Though recommended for the CMH the four were awarded Distinguished Service Crosses. After the freeing of Manila their company fought om two mountains east of the city. He would receive a Bronze Star for valor & a Purple heart on one of the mpountains.

  • F.N. Wright

    I was going to sign up for HBO just for this mini-series but it appears the focus is on 3 Marines & changed my mind. Why? Because the Navy & Marines get all the attention when it comes to the Pacific Theater. In my recent post you see my Dad served with the 37th “Buckeye” Army infantry division. McCarther referred to the 37th as his “fightingest” (sic) division of the war. I mentioned Hill 700 on Bouganville my last post. During that battle the 37th virtually wiped out the Japanese division that was responsible for the “rape of Nanking.” I hope one day a mini-series is done about the Army units who served in the Pacific. One of the men awarded the DSC the day my Dad was is still alive.This is not meant to take away from the Marines or Navy’s horrendous losses in the Pacific.

  • F.N. Wright

    I was going to sign up for HBO just for this mini-series but it appears the focus is on 3 Marines & changed my mind. Why? Because the Navy & Marines get all the attention when it comes to the Pacific Theater. In my recent post you see my Dad served with the 37th “Buckeye” Army infantry division. McCarther referred to the 37th as his “fightingest” (sic) division of the war. I mentioned Hill 700 on Bouganville my last post. During that battle the 37th virtually wiped out the Japanese division that was responsible for the “rape of Nanking.” I hope one day a mini-series is done about the Army units who served in the Pacific. One of the men awarded the DSC the day my Dad was is still alive.This is not meant to take away from the Marines or Navy’s horrendous losses in the Pacific.

  • Darrin McDougall

    I also was avidly waiting for this series to air on T.V but after reading Hugh Ambrose's companion book 'The Pacific' I as an Australian who's 2 grandfathers had fought in the pacific, especially in such places as New Guinea,the Solomans and Borneo,will not be watching it. As he claims in his book that the Japanese were handed their 1st defeat on land at Guadalcanal.This is a historical falsehood as the Australians defeated and turned back the Japanese at Milne Bay on 7th Sept 1942,while the brave Marines of the 1st Div. were still slugging it out there! Even the British Field Marshall William Slim is quaoted as saying “Australian troops had, at Milne Bay in New Guinea, inflicted on the Japanese their first undoubted defeat on land. If the Australians, in conditions very like ours, had done it, so could we. Some of us may forget that of all the Allies it was the Australian soldiers who first broke the spell of the invincibility of the Japanese Army; those of us who were in Burma have cause to remember.” [2] Now I fully realise that the U.S forces did the bulk of the fighting and dieing in the Pacific and we are eternally grateful for that,but when it comes to portraying history on T.V please get the facts right,and tell history as it truly was.I understand that the series is based on the memoirs of 3 men of the Marines and i'm not trying to take anything away from these brave men and thier comrades,but I do take umbrage to historians who don't get their facts right and then transfer that error to the screen!

  • Teacher

    I am a history teacher in Australia and agree with Darrin McDougall. While by no means trying to undermine the massive role played by the US in the Pacific campaign, I was somewhat surprised by the claim made in the 2nd episode of “the Pacific” that all Australia's men were off fighting “against Rommel”, making the US the saviour of Australia. As noted above, the first land victory of the allies against Japan in WW2 was by Australian soldiers at Milne Bay in PNG. It would have been nice if this could have been at least referred to.