Trailer for Hanks and Spielberg’s HBO Mini-Series The Pacific

4 Comments

How long have I been waiting to see Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg return to the land of World War II mini-series aka “The Pacific”? Forever, it seems. The duo already gave us the genre-defining “Band of Brothers”, set entirely in the European theater of WWII, and now they’ve moved their focus over to the pacific and the battle against the Japanese. Take a look at the trailer shown over the weekend below. One word: EPIC. The visuals in this thing are out of this world, and if it can reach just half the heights of “Band of Brothers” — a tall order, indeed — it’ll have accomplished its mission.

A 10-part mini-series from the creators of “Band of Brothers” telling the intertwined stories of three Marines during America’s battle with the Japanese in the Pacific during World War II.

Directors for the 10-parter include Carl Franklin, David Nutter, Timothy Van Patten, and Jeremy Podeswa. The mini-series will star Isabel Lucas, Rami Malek, Joseph Mazzello, William Sadler, Jon Bernthal, Jacob Pitts, Jon Seda, Ashton Holmes, Matt Craven, and Cariba Heine, among many, many more.

My guess is, as with “Band of Brothers”, a lot of the actors will be new, and the characters will drift in and out of the various episodes, but as the show nears its conclusion, you’ll know all you need to know about most, if not all of the main characters. Certainly, Hanks and Spielberg have a lot to live up to after “Band of Brothers”, but with a mega budget and HBO being able to go the whole nine yards on this thing without fear of censors, we’re looking at potentially another great classic. Potentially.

The mini-series is scheduled to air on HBO in 2010.


Author: Nix

Editor/Writer at BeyondHollywood.com. Likes: long walks on the beach and Kevin Costner post-apocalyptic movies. Dislikes: 3D, shaky cam, and shaky cam in 3D. Got a site issue? Wanna submit Movie/TV news? Or to email me in regards to anything on the site, you can do so at nix (at) beyondhollywood.com.
  • David

    I’m a Brit – 50 years old now and both my parents served in th RAF during WW2 in Europe and then the far east. Like so many others they seldom talked about their experiences and I’ve been trying to piece together what it must have been like. I loved Band of Brothers although it obviously just showed a US experience and am really looking forward to Pacific. I guess a lot of us are in the same position trying to understand and make sense of what our parents went through over 60 years ago. I just wish they were still around to ask.

  • David

    I’m a Brit – 50 years old now and both my parents served in th RAF during WW2 in Europe and then the far east. Like so many others they seldom talked about their experiences and I’ve been trying to piece together what it must have been like. I loved Band of Brothers although it obviously just showed a US experience and am really looking forward to Pacific. I guess a lot of us are in the same position trying to understand and make sense of what our parents went through over 60 years ago. I just wish they were still around to ask.

  • Paul

    I have only seen up to episode 4 of the series & have found if very well done. It shows the horrors of the war in the Pacific as encountered by the U.S Marines in vivid detail. The series is however called the “Pacific “. Not “The Marines in the Pacific “. Australia is shown as a nation that did little to defend itself when in truth Australian troops & latter U.S army troops were engaged in bitter fighting for a far longer period of time than the Marines. This was in New Guinea, & in worse conditions. The first land defeat suffered by Japan in WW2 was at the hands of Australian troops at the battle of Milne Bay. The bulk of the land fighting in the first year of the war following the fall of the Philippines, Dutch colonies & Malaya was by Australian troops who were latter supported by the U.S Army; in New Guinea. I don’t wish to down play the courage & fighting spirit of the U.S marines; they are second to none. But they were not on their own. The highlight of the Guadalcanal fight in the first episode was the Battle of Tenaru. Here 917 Japanese charged 3,000 well dug in marines. The battle lasted one night. Compare this to the Battle of Isurava were 400 battle weary Australian militia & army , armed with nothing heavier than a few WW1 Lewis guns fought for 4 days against 2,500 Japanese who had artillery .They then made a fighting withdrawal to another defensive line . On the Kakoda track the Australians were outnumbered 5 to 1, but defeated the Japanese. In every battle that the Marines fought against the Japanese they had numerical & material superiority. The early fighting in New Guinea it was the Japanese who held numerical & material superiority over the Australians. The US Army did not come on the seen until the Australian Army had pushed the Japanese back to their coastal bases. To recognize that for a large part of the Pacific war it was a team effort does not diminish the heroism & great sacrifice of American forces. For a very balanced account of the War in the Pacific, written by an American historian I would subject “Touched with Fire “by Eric M Bergerud.

  • Paul

    I have only seen up to episode 4 of the series & have found if very well done. It shows the horrors of the war in the Pacific as encountered by the U.S Marines in vivid detail. The series is however called the “Pacific “. Not “The Marines in the Pacific “. Australia is shown as a nation that did little to defend itself when in truth Australian troops & latter U.S army troops were engaged in bitter fighting for a far longer period of time than the Marines. This was in New Guinea, & in worse conditions. The first land defeat suffered by Japan in WW2 was at the hands of Australian troops at the battle of Milne Bay. The bulk of the land fighting in the first year of the war following the fall of the Philippines, Dutch colonies & Malaya was by Australian troops who were latter supported by the U.S Army; in New Guinea. I don’t wish to down play the courage & fighting spirit of the U.S marines; they are second to none. But they were not on their own. The highlight of the Guadalcanal fight in the first episode was the Battle of Tenaru. Here 917 Japanese charged 3,000 well dug in marines. The battle lasted one night. Compare this to the Battle of Isurava were 400 battle weary Australian militia & army , armed with nothing heavier than a few WW1 Lewis guns fought for 4 days against 2,500 Japanese who had artillery .They then made a fighting withdrawal to another defensive line . On the Kakoda track the Australians were outnumbered 5 to 1, but defeated the Japanese. In every battle that the Marines fought against the Japanese they had numerical & material superiority. The early fighting in New Guinea it was the Japanese who held numerical & material superiority over the Australians. The US Army did not come on the seen until the Australian Army had pushed the Japanese back to their coastal bases. To recognize that for a large part of the Pacific war it was a team effort does not diminish the heroism & great sacrifice of American forces. For a very balanced account of the War in the Pacific, written by an American historian I would subject “Touched with Fire “by Eric M Bergerud.